Tonight on CFRC 101.9fm: Playing some music by ViolenceKinit HerCloud CoverJenny Hvalvenetian snaresLussuriaand more. Tune in to ‘The Anatomy Lesson’ at 11pm EST.

This show is archived on cfrcradio (www.cfrc.ca)

The Fates - “Strength I” Furia
Kinit Her - “Reconcile” The Poet & The Blue Flower 
Bremen - “Threshold Crossing” Second Launch 
Violence - “Halo” Violence Erlebnis

Cloud Cover - “Magic Medicine” Mirror Me
Je Suis Le Petit Chevalier - “The Orchid Cantata” Those Vermillion Sands
Lussuria - “Breath of Cinder” Industriale Illuminato
Venetian Snares - “1000 Years” My Love is a Bulldozer
Jenny Hval & Susanna - “I Have Walked This Body” Meshes of Voice

Tonight on CFRC 101.9fm: The Anatomy Lesson at 11pm. Featuring music from PapakiWas Ist Dass collection of South American psychedelicLegoweltJim-E StackShabazz PalacesEvy JaneKassem MosseIbibio Sound MachineOrphan Swordsnoura mint seymali & Edvard Graham Lewis (of Wire fame). Tune in to end your night!

False Sir Nicholas - “Octarine Pathways” La Psicotropia Compilation
Legowelt - “Experiential Awakening” Crystal Cult 2080
Shabazz Palaces - “Motion Sickness” Lese Majesty
Kassem Mosse - “Untitled A1” Workshop 19

Noura Mint Seymali - “El Mougelmen” Tzenni
Edvard Graham Lewis - “Bluebird” All Over
Jim E-Stack - “Is It Me” Tell Me I Belong
Ibibio Sound Machine - “Let’s Dance (Yak Inek Unek)” Ibibio Sound Machine 
Evy Jane - “Worry Heart” Closer EP
Klara Lewis - “Muezzin” Ett
Orphan Swords - “Haagenti” Risk In A New Age

"Bourgeois legality and crime—these are, by the rules of the crime novel, opposites. Brecht’s procedure consists in retaining the highly developed technique of the crime novel, but dispensing with its rules. In this crime novel the actual relation between bourgeois legality and crime is presented. The latter is shown to be a special case of exploitation sanctioned by the former.”

- Walter Benjamin on Bertold Brecht’s Der Dreigroschenroman (The Threepenny Novel, 1934), quoted in Todd Herzog, Crime Stories: Criminalistic Fantasy and the Culture of Crisis in Weimar Germany. New York: Berghahn Books, 2009, p. 27.

Tonight on CFRC 101.9fm: The Anatomy Lesson. Some songs about discovering loss. Music by Andrew SiskWillis Earl Beal, Old Haunt, Elite Gymnastics, ScammersDama/Libra, O andVår. I also squeezed in some earlyThee Silver Mt. Zion Memorial Orchestra for old times sake. Tune in at 11 pm or check out the archive at CFRC.ca.

Andrew Sisk - “The Passing of the Buffalo by Buckskin” The Passing of the Buffalo by Buckskin (2014)
The Silver Mt. Zion Memorial Orchestra & Tra-La-La Band - “Take These Hands and Throw Them In The River” Born into Trouble as the Sparks Fly Upward (2001)
Willis Earl Beal - “Waste It Away” Experiments In Time (2014)
Elite Gymnastics - “Here, In Heaven 2” RUIN (2011)

O - “Lack of Interest In Things They Used To Do” When Plants Turn Into Stones (2014)
Old Haunt - “Ghost Town” Empty Heart (2013)
Scammers - “Struggle” Lightning/Shelters/Thunder (2014)
Dama/Libra - “The Chant” Claw (2014)
Vår - “Brodermordet” At War for Youth (2012)

"It is argued that self-interest will prevent excessive cruelty; as if self-interest protected our domestic animals, which are far less likely than degraded slaves, to stir up the rage of their savage masters. It is an argument long since protested against with noble feeling, and strikingly exemplified, by the ever-illustrious Humboldt.  It is often attempted to palliate slavery by comparing the state of slaves with our poorer countrymen: if the misery of our poor be caused not by the laws of nature, but by our institutions, great is our sin; but how this bears on slavery, I cannot see; as well might the use of the thumb-screw be defended in one land, by showing that men in another land suffered from some dreadful disease. Those who look tenderly at the slave owner, and with a cold heart at the slave, never seem to put themselves into the position of the latter; what a cheerless prospect, with not even a hope of change! picture to yourself the chance, ever hanging over you, of you wife and your little children—those objects which nature urges even the slave to call his own—being torn from you and sold like beasts to the first bidder! And these deeds are done and palliated by men, who profess to love their neighbours as themselves, who believe in God, and pray that his Will be done on earth! It makes one’s blood boil, yet heart tremble, to think that we Englishmen and our American descendants, with their boastful cry of liberty, have been and are so guilty…” 
- Charles Darwin, Voyage of the Beagle, or Journal and Remarks (1839).  This version: London: P. F. Collier & Son, 1909.
Zoom Info
"It is argued that self-interest will prevent excessive cruelty; as if self-interest protected our domestic animals, which are far less likely than degraded slaves, to stir up the rage of their savage masters. It is an argument long since protested against with noble feeling, and strikingly exemplified, by the ever-illustrious Humboldt.  It is often attempted to palliate slavery by comparing the state of slaves with our poorer countrymen: if the misery of our poor be caused not by the laws of nature, but by our institutions, great is our sin; but how this bears on slavery, I cannot see; as well might the use of the thumb-screw be defended in one land, by showing that men in another land suffered from some dreadful disease. Those who look tenderly at the slave owner, and with a cold heart at the slave, never seem to put themselves into the position of the latter; what a cheerless prospect, with not even a hope of change! picture to yourself the chance, ever hanging over you, of you wife and your little children—those objects which nature urges even the slave to call his own—being torn from you and sold like beasts to the first bidder! And these deeds are done and palliated by men, who profess to love their neighbours as themselves, who believe in God, and pray that his Will be done on earth! It makes one’s blood boil, yet heart tremble, to think that we Englishmen and our American descendants, with their boastful cry of liberty, have been and are so guilty…” 
- Charles Darwin, Voyage of the Beagle, or Journal and Remarks (1839).  This version: London: P. F. Collier & Son, 1909.
Zoom Info

"It is argued that self-interest will prevent excessive cruelty; as if self-interest protected our domestic animals, which are far less likely than degraded slaves, to stir up the rage of their savage masters. It is an argument long since protested against with noble feeling, and strikingly exemplified, by the ever-illustrious Humboldt.  It is often attempted to palliate slavery by comparing the state of slaves with our poorer countrymen: if the misery of our poor be caused not by the laws of nature, but by our institutions, great is our sin; but how this bears on slavery, I cannot see; as well might the use of the thumb-screw be defended in one land, by showing that men in another land suffered from some dreadful disease. Those who look tenderly at the slave owner, and with a cold heart at the slave, never seem to put themselves into the position of the latter; what a cheerless prospect, with not even a hope of change! picture to yourself the chance, ever hanging over you, of you wife and your little children—those objects which nature urges even the slave to call his own—being torn from you and sold like beasts to the first bidder! And these deeds are done and palliated by men, who profess to love their neighbours as themselves, who believe in God, and pray that his Will be done on earth! It makes one’s blood boil, yet heart tremble, to think that we Englishmen and our American descendants, with their boastful cry of liberty, have been and are so guilty…” 


- Charles Darwin, Voyage of the Beagle, or Journal and Remarks (1839).  This version: London: P. F. Collier & Son, 1909.

Polly: But don’t you care?Cyberman: Care? No, why should I care?Polly: Because they’re people and they’re going to die!Cyberman: I do not understand you. There are people dying all over your world, yet you do not care about them. - Doctor Who, “The Tenth Planet”, 1966.  Image source.

Polly: But don’t you care?
Cyberman: Care? No, why should I care?
Polly: Because they’re people and they’re going to die!
Cyberman: I do not understand you. There are people dying all over your world, yet you do not care about them. 

Doctor Who, “The Tenth Planet”, 1966.  Image source.